Winter Weight Fabrics

Winter Weight Fabrics

Compared to what your grandfather and great-grandfather might have worn, modern suits are much lighter (you can thank central heating for that). So while you may no longer be relying on your suit jacket and trousers as the first line of defense against the cold, a winter-weight wool will still be appreciated when temperatures drop.

Not all winter-weight wools are alike, however. While they share the common trait of adding warmth, they can be sorted by distinct weaves

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Flannel

A common misconception is that flannel is a pattern. It’s actually a fabric, though it is often used in shirts with tartan patterns. Flannel is made from cotton or wool: flannel shirts are typically cotton, and flannel suits, sportcoats, and trousers are often wool.

What makes flannel distinct is its slightly nappy surface, which gives it a raised texture, a soft hand-feel, and a generally cozy character. The grey flannel suit is a classic staple, but it can often turn up in interesting patterns like tartan as well.

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Herringbone

Herringbone is an iconic pattern made up of two rows of vertical v’s that run in opposition to one another, like a zig zag. It has a long history that goes from Ancient Rome to the military uniforms of WWII and has also been used in woodwork, masonry and more. When it comes to clothing, herringbone is most often woven from wool and associated with heavy tweeds and fall and winter clothing. It’s an easy way to add a bit of visual and textural interest to your colder-weather wardrobe.

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Wool

If it isn’t classified as either of the above, just consider it to be a winter-weight wool. It’s spun from the same stuff as its lighter, four-season cousins, but in this case, the weight is heavier so it can serve as a better insulator against cold.

 

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